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Past Highlights Announcements

CNAS Graduate Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Scholarship 2021 - 2022

 

This scholarship awarded to students who promote work in diversity, equity, and inclusion. Congratulations to Jonathan Alcaraz and Savanna Gee. Please follow the link to read their messages about the scholarship.

Jonathan Alcaraz and Savanna Gee

 

Congratulations to Therese-Marie Landry
Therese-Marie Landry

Congratulations to Therese-Marie Landry for her award of a Postdoctoral Fellowship of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI). She will be affiliated with “The Analysis and Geometry for Random Spaces” Program in 2022.

As a noncommutative fractal geometer, Therese is  interested  in identifying  elements  of  fractality  that  can  be  recovered  from  function  spaces on fractals. In particular, she uses operator algebraic tools to build finite approximations of fractals with the goal of obtaining, as well as achieving new insights about, the geometry of the limiting object. Classical geometry relies on curves and surfaces that appear locally Euclidean. In contrast, fractals are infinite objects often characterized by self-similarity -- the repetition of a base pattern across a boundless set of scales. Scientists have successfully modified fractal patterns to model many diverse natural phenomena such as the bronchial tubes of a lung, the canopy of a tree, the network of blood vessels in the human body, the pathway of a lightning bolt, and the distribution of noise in data transmission over a communications channel. Because fractal structure in nature has self-similarity over an extended but finite scale range,  advancement in the theory of finite approximations of fractals can lead to a better understanding of how fractal structures arise and evolve in nature.

Noncommutative geometry analyzes a space by studying the algebra of functions on that space. Since spaces that do not have paths or smooth structure often still admit many kinds of functions, ideas and tools from noncommutative geometry open up promising avenues for generalizing manifolds to describe quantum phenomena, where the wave function of a particle, but not its path in space, can be understood. Similarly, fractals, which often appear pathological in the setting of classical geometry, can be studied on the same rigorous footing as Riemannian manifolds when viewed as noncommutative spaces.


Therese joined UCR Math in fall 2015. Her thesis adviser is Dr. Lapidus. For additional information on research activities at UCR Math, please visit: https://mathdept.ucr.edu/events/weekly-seminars
 

MSRI is a nationally funded research center. For information on MSRI, please visit: https://www.msri.org/web/cms

 

In Memoriam: Theodore Joseph Barth, Jr.;  Professor Emeritus of Mathematics; May 30, 1939 - March 17, 2020

 

Theodore Barth Jr. UCR

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics, Theodore Joseph Barth, Jr., passed away on March 17, 2020. He was 80 years old.

Born on May 30, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois, Ted was the oldest child of Theodore J. Barth, Sr. and Mary Barth. From a young age, Ted excelled in math and science. He attended St. Mary’s School in Colorado Springs, Colorado on a full academic scholarship throughout grade school and high school until he graduated in 1957. Ted graduated summa cum laude from Regis College in Denver, Colorado with a B.S. in Mathematics in 1961. Having received a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship, he attended the University of Notre Dame and received his master's and doctoral degrees in Mathematics. After graduating from the University of Notre Dame, he went on to be a Visiting Assistant Professor at Notre Dame, a Visiting Faculty Member at Tulane University, and a Visiting Faculty Member at the University of California, Berkeley.

In 1972, Professor Barth joined the Department of Mathematics at the University of California, Riverside as a faculty member until he retired in 1992. Professor Barth contributed to the UCR and mathematical communities in numerous ways, serving on multiple Academic Senate committees and councils, as well as serving on the Chancellor’s Task Force on Student Services and the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee. As a mentor, he was an advisor for graduate and undergraduate students, and developed software programs to collect, compile, and run student assignments for the Mathematics Department. In research, Professor Barth focused on complex analysis and contributed a vast number of carefully produced referee reports and reviews. In the classroom, Professor Barth was a thoroughly well-prepared instructor. His message was clear, concise, and to the point. Professor Barth was known to be one of the most rigorous graders in the department, but his supportive and friendly personality also made him an extremely well liked and respected teacher.

Professor Barth was a train enthusiast and an avid photographer. Ted was incredibly generous and gave to many organizations, as well as supporting the education of his grand nieces and nephews, and his great-grand nieces. Ted is survived by his sister Mary Ann and the generations of nieces and nephews from his family.

 

Dr. Brian Collier Joins UCR Math Department in Fall 2020

 

Brian Collier, UCR Math

Before joining UCR, Dr. Collier was an NSF post-doctoral fellow at the University of Maryland.

Dr. Brian Collier's research focuses on the interplay of different areas of math such as algebraic geometry, dynamical systems, gauge theory, Lie theory, and geometric group theory. In particular, he uses Higgs bundles and Nonabelian Hodge theory to study certain generalizations of hyperbolic geometry called Anosov representations and higher Teichmüller theory.

To get to know Dr. Collier’s activities, please visit his website: https://sites.google.com/view/brian-collier/home

 

 

Dr. Jia Gou joins UCR Math Department in Fall 2020

Jia Gou UCR Mathematics

 

Dr. Jia Gou joins UCR Math Department in fall 2020, and a member of the Interdisciplinary Center for Quantitative Modeling in Biology (ICQMB) of the MathDepartment. Before joining UCR, Dr. Gou was a post-doctoral fellow in the University of Minnesota.

Dr. Jia Gou works in the area of nonlinear differential equations, dynamical systems and mathematical modeling of biological processes. In particular, she uses analytic tools such as asymptotic analysis and bifurcation analysis to study phenomena observed in a group of coupled cells or bacteria. She now uses computational tools including stochastic simulations and finite element method with adaptive meshes to understand the mechanism corresponding to the establishment of the gradient distribution of some diffusing molecules in both continuous and discrete senses.

To get to know Dr. Gou’s activities, please visit her website: https://profiles.ucr.edu/app/home/profile/jgou

To get to know ICQMB’s activities, please visit its website: https://icqmb.ucr.edu

 

Dr. Patricio Gallardo joins the UCR Mathematics Department

Patricio Gallardo UCR Mathematics

July of 2020 Dr. Patricio Gallardo joined UCR as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics. Before joining UCR he was a post-doctoral fellow at Washington University and University of Georgia. His mathematical interests include algebraic geometry, singularity theory, and Hodge theory. Dr. Gallardo is also interested in more interdisciplinary work.

To learn more about Dr. Gallardo’s activities, please visit his website: https://profiles.ucr.edu/app/home/profile/pgallard

 

Dr. Eloísa Grifo Joins the UCR Mathematics Department as a New Assistant Professor

Eloísa Grifo, UCR Mathematics

 

From Dr. Grifo's Website:

"I am an assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of California, Riverside. My research interests lie in commutative algebra. Sean Sather-Wagstaff and I are organizing the Commutative and Homological Algebra Market Presentations (CHAMP) seminar, a weekly online seminar showcasing the work of graduate students and early career researchers in Commutative Algebra who are on the job market, on Wednesdays at 3 pm EST. I run the UCR Commutative Algebra Seminar with Alessandra Costantini. Previously, I was a postdoc at The University of Michigan. I got my PhD at the University of Virginia, where my advisor was Craig Huneke. Before that, I studied at Instituto Superior Técnico, in Portugal, where I first learned commutative algebra from Maria Vaz Pinto."

To learn more about Dr. Grifo and her research you may visit her personal site here: https://eloisagrifo.github.io/

 

Product Rules and New Insight Through Fourier Analysis


Every calculus student uses product rule to calculate the derivative of the product of two functions.In a recent article in the Notice of American Mathematical Society, Dr. Rodolfo Torres explains how modern Fourier Analysis takes this subject afar in functional analysis and applications.

Dr. Rodolfo Torres is a Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development since fall 2019.To find out more about Dr. Rodolfo at UCR, please visit website: https://profiles.ucr.edu/app/home/profile/rodolfot

 

UCR Math Interdisciplinary Project is Co-Funded by the NSF Division of Mathematical Sciences and the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences


Led by Dr. Mark Alber (PI) of UCR Math, a group of investigators from UCR and Notre Dame, is funded by the NSF for nearly $900,000 in the project NSF DMS 2029814 Project Title: MODULUS: Integrative multiscale modeling and multimodalexperiments to decode systems-level molecular mechanisms of epithelial systems.

This project seeks to combine mathematical modeling and experimentation to bridge the critical knowledge gaps required to predict how molecular signaling controlled by morphogens such as the Bone Morphogenetic Protein(BMP) and Wingless/WNT signaling pathways through cytoskeletal regulators drives cell and tissue shape generation and maintenance during embryo development.

Members of the team will integrate breakthroughs in mathematical theory of reaction-diffusion PDE systems on extending and deforming manifolds coupled with coarse graining mechanistic modeling approaches describing cell membrane and cytoskeleton with machine learning based surrogate models for image analysis, parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis.

Outreach activities of the project will be coordinated with the UCR InterdisciplinaryCenter for Quantitative Modeling in Biology (ICQMB: https://icqmb.ucr.edu/).

Interdisciplinary Team:
Principal Investigator: Mark Alber, University of California, Riverside
Co-PI: Weitao Chen, University of California, Riverside
Co-PI: Amit K Roy Chowdhury, University of California, Riverside
Co-PI: Jeremiah Zartman, University of Notre Dame
Co-PI: Alexander Dowling, University of Notre Dame

 

 

Co-sponsored by UCR Math’s Interdisciplinary Center for Quantitative Modeling in Biology and the Lorentz Center In Leiden, The Netherlands, Dr. Mark Alber co-organizes the Summer School “Modeling of Shape and Size in Biological Development”

 

Lorentz Center


Students are encouraged to participate in online activities including listening to review talks and working on introductory projects. These activities will culminate in intense training and exchange program from 24 to 28 August, 2020.

A follow up Special Session to be held at the 2021 Annual SMB Meeting, June 13-17, 2021at UCR as well as a Workshop at the Lorentz Center sometime in 2021-22 are planned.

The Summer School focuses on mathematical multiscale models of animal and plant development and plant growth. School participants will work with models rooted in the cellular level, i.e., models making links between cellular processes such as cellular growth and  division, cell movement and interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM), mechanical or chemical  signaling between cells, etc., leading to organ shape development and growth at higher spatial scales.

Graduate students will be exposed to state-of-the-art examples of multiscale modeling in development. They will get hands-on experience with the development of mathematical and computational models as well as model calibration using experimental data. They will also develop in teams simple, but novel example models to answer open scientific questions proposed by the speakers ahead of time. Students will be expected to already have some experience in modeling but will be asked to work with a method that is new to them.

https://www.lorentzcenter.nl/modeling-shape-and-size-in-biological-development.html

 

 

Dr. David Weisbart Shares His Experience With Online Teaching

Dr. David Weisbart has been conducting online teaching at UCR Mathematics for several years. David is the PI for one ILTI grant and co-PI for two. In the video here he shares his advice and insights on how one may run online teaching.

 

Representing Mathematics in Science through the AAAS:
Dr. Michel Lapidus
 

Michel Lapidus

 

The American Association for the Advancement of Science has been working to “advance science, engineering and innovation throughout the world for the benefit of all people”.

To this end their goals to:

  • Enhance communication among scientists, engineers, and the public
  • Promote and defend the integrity of science and its use
  • Strengthen support for the science and technology enterprise
  • Provide a voice for science on societal issues
  • Promote the responsible use of science in public policy
  • Strengthen and diversify the science and technology workforce
  • Foster education in science and technology for everyone
  • Increase public engagement with science and technology
  • Advance international cooperation in science

In light of these goals the AAAS elects members of the scientific community to represent and pursue these goals. To this end, the AAAS and its members have seen fit to elect Dr. Michel Lapidus of the UC Riverside Mathematics Department as a Council Delegate for Mathematics. In this role Dr. Lapidus will share his wealth of experience and knowledge as a Distinguished Professor of Mathematics at UCR, the American Mathematical Society’s Associate Secretary for the Western Section and now as elected part of the AAAS.Considering his current positions at UCR, AMS and AAAS, Dr. Lapidus’ reflects, “…I hope to be able to help repay my debt to them all in taking on this new function. I also hope that this will eventually enable us to establish new ties between the AAAS, the AMS and other sister organizations sharing the same general humanitarian and scholarly goals, and more importantly, also between their members and their supporters.”

Past Highlights Events

The Women in MathArt/Riverside Mathematics Workshop for Excellence & Diversity: Research, Creativity, & Teaching Conference
Women in Math/Art

This conference will showcase women researching mathematics and the arts and creative pedagogies and is our first step towards creating a research network Women in MathArt, whose goal is to be a resource for the artistic math community celebrating the empowering intersections between mathematics and the arts, and an inviting space for members to learn from each other. The conference will be held virtually through Zoom on October 16th - 17th, 2021. The conference is in cooperation with AWM. We gratefully acknowledge the Institute for Advanced Study, Women and Mathematics Program, Lisa Simonyi, the AWM Chapter at UCR, and the UCR Department of Mathematics.

For details, please visit: https://sites.google.com/view/women-in-mathart-conference/home

 

Virtual Society for Mathematical Biology Annual Meeting 2021
June 13 - 17, 2021
SMB logo

We are excited to virtually host the meeting on behalf of the University of California Riverside (UCR) along with the inclusion of most colleges and universities in California!

While COVID-19 continues spreading across the world, the Society for Mathematical Biology is keeping the health and safety of our members as our top priority. To reduce or slow the spread of infection, we will hold our 2021 Annual Meeting in a virtual form between June 13-17, 2021. We acknowledge that many are facing challenging personal and/or professional circumstances, but we hope that our virtual Annual Meeting will allow our community to stay connected, share research, and support each other. The meeting will be held 24 hours a day to maximize the participation of people across the world.

For registration, schedules and more please visit smb2021.org

 

Women in Combinatorics & Representation Theory - Diversity & Excellence Workshop
 
Women in Combinatorics and Representation Theory Poster
The 2021 UC Riverside Diversity Workshop will be focused on Women in Combinatorics and Representation Theory.
 
The goal is to feature women who work on the many different aspects of these subjects and who work in a variety of institutions; including research universities, smaller state schools, liberal arts colleges and in industry/government.
 
This virtual workshop will take place on May 15-16, 2021 and will feature five plenary talks, two panel discussions, and five short talks.
 
For More Information Visit the Workshop Site

 

Register Here

 

SMB Diversity Workshop 2021
 

Virtual Workshop on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Mathematical Biology to be held on Friday, March 26th from 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. PDT: https://icqmb.ucr.edu/smb-diversity-workshop-2021

This workshop, co-sponsored by the UCR Center for Quantitative Modeling in Biology, is being held in connection and in preparation for the SMB 2021: https://www.smb2021.org/home

Please register here if you want to participate (free registration): https://ucmerced.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_crPmkNyNTSu_YQDESIUlfQ

We invite the mathematical biology community and mathematical community in general to join us as we engage in a critical reflection of our  practices in order to cultivate a culture in which all voices are heard, valued and validated. Together, by sharing stories and identifying concrete actions, we can make space for everyone. We encourage you to give us your input by completing the questionnaire found here on our website. We look forward to seeing you on March 26th.

 

Women in Combinatorics and Representation Theory
 

UC Riverside Ranked No. 1 in Social Mobility Among National Universities - U.S. News & World Report second-year-in-a-row

The theme of UCR’s Third Annual Workshop on “Excellence and Diversity in Mathematics” will be“Women in Combinatorics and Representation Theory”.

It will take place on May 15-16, 2021 online. Deadline for submitting short talks is on February 28, 2021.For program details or submission of short talks, please visit https://sites.google.com/g.ucla.edu/ucr-diversity-2021/

 

Co-sponsored by UCR Math’s Interdisciplinary Center for Quantitative Modeling in Biology and the Lorentz Center In Leiden, The Netherlands, Dr. Mark Alber co-organizes the Summer School “Modeling of Shape and Size in Biological Development”

 

Lorentz Center


Students are encouraged to participate in online activities including listening to review talks and working on introductory projects. These activities will culminate in intense training and exchange program from 24 to 28 August, 2020.

A follow up Special Session to be held at the 2021 Annual SMB Meeting, June 13-17, 2021at UCR as well as a Workshop at the Lorentz Center sometime in 2021-22 are planned.

The Summer School focuses on mathematical multiscale models of animal and plant development and plant growth. School participants will work with models rooted in the cellular level, i.e., models making links between cellular processes such as cellular growth and  division, cell movement and interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM), mechanical or chemical  signaling between cells, etc., leading to organ shape development and growth at higher spatial scales.

Graduate students will be exposed to state-of-the-art examples of multiscale modeling in development. They will get hands-on experience with the development of mathematical and computational models as well as model calibration using experimental data. They will also develop in teams simple, but novel example models to answer open scientific questions proposed by the speakers ahead of time. Students will be expected to already have some experience in modeling but will be asked to work with a method that is new to them.

https://www.lorentzcenter.nl/modeling-shape-and-size-in-biological-development.html

 

 

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